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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hello, can any help me with what the big black round plug at the top of the turbo is for I see a harness connected to it, wonder what it does?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes the black round plug on the turbo that has the harness coming off of it running along the head
 

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I do believe that is the PCV line I was going to tap into that line with a catch can on my Buick.

I could never come up with a good spot to mount the catch can, I let it slide because they might give me warranty woes if I had a problem with the turbo or the engine itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am not sure if you are talking about the same thing as me I have circled it in red.
 

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At first I didn't believe it was the PCV line either.

I would still like to install a catch can just to see if it picks up any oil.

I had a can on my new corvette, the amount of oil that can caught was disturbing, an engine that new should not have that much oil in the PCV system.

I used the same can on my new Miata engine, it picked up far less oil in the PCV
 

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In cruze forum,they said this engine didn't need a catch can.
Don't believe evrything they say, check it out:
It's the A14NET/B14NET engine)))
And I suppose B14XFT(used on restyled Trax) also needs an oil vapour catch can.
 

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Don't believe everything they say, check it out:

It's the A14NET/B14NET engine)))
And I suppose B14XFT(used on restyled Trax) also needs an oil vapor catch can.
Now this time I have to disagree. It doesn't need a catch can but it can't hurt especially if you don't use the recommended oil. A little oil flowing by the valve never hurt an engine. Synthetic oil doesn't sludge or gum up the valves. (Look at a 2 stroke ) Personally I think a catch can on this engine is useless and I believe it it would have needed it GM would have put one there.
 

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Only if it's dyno oil and dyno oil is not recommended in these engines. The blend isn't even recommended anymore.
 

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The oil debate is never ending...

You mean DINO?
OK. There is no such thing as fully synthetic. At least, let's say, for "civil" applications.
Fully synthetic is just a commercial term.
Let's keep it simple.
There are several oil groups:
https://www.machinerylubrication.com/Read/29113/base-oil-groups
Depending on how they are refined(severely hydrocracked))) one may say that group III are synthetic oils. Or not.
Group IV and group V oils are synthetic, but they cannot be used in our engines just like that.
They need mineral(dino) oil to be mixed with, cause not all anti wear components(and other components) will dissolve in synthetic oils.
Now, there is a blending recipe and that recipe(formulation) is usually a commercial secret, cause not all "right off the shelf" engine oils are equal.
You buy one oil and it's done in 4k miles, and you fill another one and it's OK over 10K miles.
But both can be certified by GM, par exemple, for the same application.
The difference is just how many miles you can put into your engine with one or another.
One must be changed at 3-4K miles, another at 7-8K miles. It's also the driving conditions that are important for the durability of the oil.

Finally. All that has nothing to do with the catalytic converter in your car. Or it has, but...
Not all fully synthetic (both as commercial term and as real synthetic) lubricants are good for your converter. Because of the additives.
There are different additives(compounds added to oil) that can damage the converter. It depends on the type of the engine and converter -
there are different oil additives for diesel engines with DPF and there are other for gas engines, and more - the gas engines have different converters, that may require different additives.

Some reading on this topic:
https://www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/770637/
https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/00368790110408337
http://jultika.oulu.fi/files/isbn9789514286087.pdf

So, this is why, some automobile "manufacturers" certify the oils they recommend to be used in their cars for such a thing as Aftertreatment Compatibility.
Well, they do it also because of the great amount of money they receive for the certification process)))

More about oils' Aftertreatment Compatibility here:
https://passenger.lubrizoladditives360.com/acea-aftertreatment-compatibility/

To compare the Aftertreatment Compatibility of different oil specifications go here: https://online.lubrizol.com/relperftool/pc.html

The oil used in A/B14NET must be not synthetic(both as commercial term and as real synthetic), but must be certified as dexos1 or dexos1 gen 2 oil.
Or it may be synthetic(both as commercial term and as real synthetic), BUT, anyway, it must be certified as dexos1 or dexos1 gen 2 oil.
And man, surely there are some not "very" certified oils out there that are better than those certified, but how would we know wich ones?
)))
There are also markets where GM recommends to fill this engine with dexos2 oil as a service oil, however there is debate on that, and no one is confident(even GM) should they put dexos2 oil into A/B14NET or not. I have read about A/B14NET that made 50k miles on dexos2 and the engine was running just fine. Some people said they noticed a smoother engine run on low revs on dexos1(both gen 1 and gen 2). Some say it's the same on both - dexos1 and dexos2(not to be confused with dexos1 gen 2).
The oil debate is never ending...
And finally everyone, from the oil guy to "da" big corporation, is proud to take more money from your wallet)))

So, an oil vapour catch can may be useful, cause some oils(mineral or synthetic(both as commercial term and as real synthetic)) are more volatile than others.
Even if they are certified by GM)))
It's up to you to decide upon the installation)))
 
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