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Discussion Starter #1
My 2016 LT was in for free oil change and tire rotation. While waiting, the technician came out and said that a wheel stud had broken and they were going to replace it. He said that they DO use a torque wrench. I had failed to tell them NOT to rotate the tires because I rotate them when putting seasonal tires on and off. When I got home, I put the car up on my lift and put the tires back where I had them. I set my torque wrench to 100 lb/ft, (per owners manual), and started to torque left front. As I started bringing the nuts up to torque it didn't feel right and sure enough I broke a stud. When I felt things weren't going right, I changed torque wrenches before the stud broke. I didn't dare torque the other studs to 100 lb/ft so I torqued the rest at 90 lb/ft with no problem. The dealer replaced the stud, I broke, for free. I inspected the broken stud and saw that the threads had stretched considerably. Has anyone else had this problem? Has anyone heard of a bulletin about this? I think there's a stud heat treatment problem or torque spec. is too high. (Similar stud size on Subaru calls for 84lb/ft).
 

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100 lbs of torque for wheel nuts is NUTZ.
Looking for broken studs @ 100 lbs. will do it, if not this time maybe next time you will see a jumped thread soft lugs will do that.

This 100 lb thing started when tire stores were installing aftermarket chrome plated wheels with chrome plated nuts, the nuts would work loose because of the slippery surfaces on the wheel and the nut when new.

So what happened, to cover tire and wheel installers asses, they came up with this 100 lb torque deal (which made sure these new nuts wouldn't move at all sometimes never again)
(now you don't have to come back to use up their valuable time they use to screw other customers, how dare you bother someone that charged you an outrageous amount of money for installing a few tires on new wheels.)

Anyone with any sense who would install new wheels, would tighten the nuts then drive the car about 50 to 100 miles, then tighten them again to make sure they stopped loosening.

You would continue to tighten the wheels as the new nuts, now and then, until they stopped loosing up on their own. (you would tighten them on average 3 times before they would stop moving on their own.

I have had about 2 wheels come loose on me it was because I was in a hurry and failed to tighten them when I let the car down off the jack.

I don't let tire stores or dealers touch my wheels or lug nuts, I have seen too many insane people with air tools and torque wrenches snap off lug nuts.

Another issue is, if I get a blow out on the highway I want to be able to remove the tire without the use of a 10 foot bar.(my estimation of what I tighten my lugs to is about 50 lbs.)
 

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I have been tightening lug nuts to spec for 40 years and have yet to break one. I have seen a lot of shops put all the lug nuts on with an impact and then just so they can say they did go over them with the torque wrench. The torque wrench is making sure that non of them are under torque. but I seldom see the wrench turn the nut at all meaning they have them way over spec.

I have seen under torqued wheels come off, it is never pretty, a loose wheel will damage the studs pretty quick.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
torque adapter

I've had my torque wrenches for quite a while and have never had them calculated. I have one snap-on dial type and the rest are clickers. I always back off the clickers to below "0" to prevent the internal spring from relaxing. If the dealer really used a torque wrench, maybe he used it to verify overly tightened lug nuts done by his air wrench, as mentioned above. Maybe the studs were already stretched by the air tool and that's why I broke one when putting the wheels back where they had been, (see original post). I'll have to pull the wheels again and check for stretched studs. The one that broke showed obvious signs of being stretched, (threads parted), after I tightened it using my torque wrench set at 100lb/ft.
I just ordered a torque adapter, (AC Delco ARM304-4S), to check my torque wrenches. It'll be interesting to see how accurate my tools are, although I've never had trouble with them before, while using them to torque, crank caps, rod caps, heads etc. I'll follow up when tool arrives.
Howard
 

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A lot of guys at dealers that I know will use the torque sticks on their impact gun and then re-torque by hand with the torque wrench after, I do often think that the torque sticks on the impact gun do push a little further than they should depending on how long you hold it for but their torque sticks are supposed to be sent out for calibration every now and then, short answer, they don't typically do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to all. I'm familiar with the shop methods described above. Like those who haven't had trouble following manufacturers torque spec. I have never had a problem. After all your input, I'm convinced the dealer over torqued my lug nuts. I guess it's my fault for not remembering to tell them not to rotate the tires. For safetys sake I'd better check all the wheel studs to see if any show signs of stretching. When does the incompetence end? Thanks for all the input.
That's it for this one.
Howard
 

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Thanks to all. I'm familiar with the shop methods described above. Like those who haven't had trouble following manufacturers torque spec. I have never had a problem. After all your input, I'm convinced the dealer over torqued my lug nuts. I guess it's my fault for not remembering to tell them not to rotate the tires. For safetys sake I'd better check all the wheel studs to see if any show signs of stretching. When does the incompetence end? Thanks for all the input.
That's it for this one.
Howard
I noticed some tech's don't use torque wrenches or have torque wrenches in need of re-calibration, its either one of those. You can always request the next time that they confirm the torque pound rating is about right.
 

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You could do that, but it's highly unlikely that they'll allow you to watch them torquing it all down the proper method and what not. You could just go home, back them off a little, and re-torque yourself worst case scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The problem with getting home, loosening and re-torquing the lug nuts is that most likely they have been stretched by an impact, an out of calibration torque wrench or torque stick of just a mechanic yanking the nuts up with an 18' breaker bar. I've been torquing wheels on my cars for years and have never broke a stud or wheel bolt. When this one broke I found that the threads were stretched at the base of the stud. There are a lot of cobbers out there, both at the dealers and at private repair shops. The last time I had a wheel bent at a tire shop, ("you need a new wheel sir"), I decided to buy my own tire changer and balancer. I don't force anything and I calibrate the balancer periodically.
Howard
 

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For what this is worth....Years ago, I had a Caravan that I had bought used....when the time came to remove the wheels I could hardly get the lug nuts off....The threads on both the lug nuts & the wheel studs were so distorted from the heat of the impact gun....No one removes or installs wheels on my vehicles except myself.... I use never cease on the threads & a lug wrench with the final torque... wrench......I hear so many ignorant people get so excited when the get a free tire rotation....they are clueless as to the ramifications. And you have to nearly argue with service advisers NOT to rotate the wheels...and I still don't trust them when the vehicle is out of my sight....All they want to do is get paid from the manufacture for a tire rotation......Lets face it the guy changing the oil is also doing the tire rotation, and at best he's a "C" tech.....Beware.......
 

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My 2¢, lug nuts should never be installed with and impact gun. Avoid broken, stretched studs and warped rotors by putting them on with a lugnut wrench or ratchet, then torque to spec. Only way to go. Then re-torque after 50-100 miles.
 
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The lug nuts will be on and off many many times, if you don't rush it they will last the life of the car, doing it fast is bound to hurt you somewhere.
Using an impact to remove stubborn over tightened bolts can be a life saver, but take your time putting them back.

What I use is a 36" breaker bar, and 6 point deep impact sockets for removing and installing lug nuts( have 2 impacts I use them on other things)
I tighten to my specs,(never lost a wheel in 45years) I don't allow an impact to be used on my cars, I usually remove my own wheels then take them to a tire shop for any tire changes and balancing.
 

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My 2016 LT was in for free oil change and tire rotation. While waiting, the technician came out and said that a wheel stud had broken and they were going to replace it. He said that they DO use a torque wrench. I had failed to tell them NOT to rotate the tires because I rotate them when putting seasonal tires on and off. When I got home, I put the car up on my lift and put the tires back where I had them. I set my torque wrench to 100 lb/ft, (per owners manual), and started to torque left front. As I started bringing the nuts up to torque it didn't feel right and sure enough I broke a stud. When I felt things weren't going right, I changed torque wrenches before the stud broke. I didn't dare torque the other studs to 100 lb/ft so I torqued the rest at 90 lb/ft with no problem. The dealer replaced the stud, I broke, for free. I inspected the broken stud and saw that the threads had stretched considerably. Has anyone else had this problem? Has anyone heard of a bulletin about this? I think there's a stud heat treatment problem or torque spec. is too high. (Similar stud size on Subaru calls for 84lb/ft).
I have a 2019 trax that went in for its first oil change and tire rotation. The service manager told us we have one broken lug and several more he didn’t trust! Talk about a lemon! Nothing we could do we had to buy another vehicle , lost a **** load of money but I’ll never buy another Chevy again ??????????
 

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So you had to buy another vehicle because a few studs were bad? Even though it's a warranty item that should be taken care of in under an hour using just hand tools?
 

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I have a 2019 trax that went in for its first oil change and tire rotation. The service manager told us we have one broken lug and several more he didn’t trust! Talk about a lemon! Nothing we could do we had to buy another vehicle , lost a **** load of money but I’ll never buy another Chevy again ??????????
And you didn't take it for a second opinion??? I just changed a stud on my daughters Encore, took me about an hour taking my time. Cost less than $20. The problem was not Chevy the problem was a trigger happy impact driver mechanic. You don't stretch or break studs with a proper torque bar. I think you made a bad decision or you didn't like the Trax to begin with because it makes no sense to me. My serpentine idler is screaming for oil which means the bearing is probably shot. I'm not going to trade my Trax and lose a bunch of money, I'm just going to change the $45 idler.
 

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100 lbs of torque for wheel nuts is NUTZ.
Looking for broken studs @ 100 lbs. will do it, if not this time maybe next time you will see a jumped thread soft lugs will do that.

This 100 lb thing started when tire stores were installing aftermarket chrome plated wheels with chrome plated nuts, the nuts would work loose because of the slippery surfaces on the wheel and the nut when new.

So what happened, to cover tire and wheel installers asses, they came up with this 100 lb torque deal (which made sure these new nuts wouldn't move at all sometimes never again)

I don't let tire stores or dealers touch my wheels or lug nuts, I have seen too many insane people with air tools and torque wrenches snap off lug nuts.

Another issue is, if I get a blow out on the highway I want to be able to remove the tire without the use of a 10 foot bar.(my estimation of what I tighten my lugs to is about 50 lbs.)
GM service manual.

 

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And you didn't take it for a second opinion??? I just changed a stud on my daughters Encore, took me about an hour taking my time. Cost less than $20. The problem was not Chevy the problem was a trigger happy impact driver mechanic. You don't stretch or break studs with a proper torque bar. I think you made a bad decision or you didn't like the Trax to begin with because it makes no sense to me. My serpentine idler is screaming for oil which means the bearing is probably shot. I'm not going to trade my Trax and lose a bunch of money, I'm just going to change the $45 idler.
So give me one reason why a new car never before serviced would have multiple lugs failing? I’ve been a welder since 1980 and know shitty bolts when I see it! Two things can cause this problem stupidity or poor craftsmanship! Both have no place in a vehicle my loved ones ride in! It could be a bad batch of lugs from China , don’t know, don’t care! My job is to pay for it ,their job is to provide a safe vehicle!
 

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They are Pre-sale serviced. My guess they put a green horn Tech on the Job. He went trigger happy with the impact set at 200 ft-lb to make sure the wheels were on tight.

All the dealer had to do is change all for hubs by a senior tech mechanic and call it a day. You would have saved yourself a **** load of money and your familly would have been safe.
 

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So give me one reason why a new car never before serviced would have multiple lugs failing? I’ve been a welder since 1980 and know shitty bolts when I see it! Two things can cause this problem stupidity or poor craftsmanship! Both have no place in a vehicle my loved ones ride in! It could be a bad batch of lugs from China , don’t know, don’t care! My job is to pay for it ,their job is to provide a safe vehicle!
 
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