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Try your owners manual. Mine says 87 octane, but mine is a 2016.
 

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the cheap low octane is good enough. back in the days if your car would start to pre-ignite or after ignition shut off the motor would stay stumbling for a few seconds that was a good indication that you needed higher octane, this little 4 banger is good with low octane.
 

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The owner’s manual is a great place to start, as has been said.

I intend on keeping my Trax until the wheels fall off. Octane and fuel detergents absolutely matter over the life of the vehicle. Although designed to use regular unleaded gas, there is much better out there.

I use Shell V-Power only, from day one driving off the dealership lot. It will range between 91-93 octane. Several independent studies have shown increased efficiency and gas mileage, and less wear, for vehicles running premium 91+ octane fuel. A more efficient engine, burning less deposits and using less fuel, is better for the environment.

Shell V-Power has the highest concentration of polyetheramine (PEA), which is a fuel detergent. Techron Complete Fuel System Cleaner, by Chevron, has the highest concentration of PEA for any fuel additive; I drop one bottle in the tank every 60 days.

Hope that helps!
 

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This makes sense to me now after experiencing a rough idling issue. I just moved to a new city a month ago and there is a WaWa right down the street that I found convenient for gas. In my old city I exclusively filled up at Sunoco, thinking if it’s good enough for NASCAR it’s good enough for. I had no idea there was a thing known as Top Tier fuel, moreover, I had no idea my Sunoco was Top Tier. This idling issue only started after 4 or 5 tanks of WaWa fuel, which isn’t top tier. I have a service appointment tomorrow to have my turbo replaced and to have idling issue checked. Think I’ll run down to Shell for V power and a bottle of Techron Fuel Injector Cleaner to see if that has an affect....
 

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Personally I avoid most places that would classify as selling 'unbranded' like a WaWa, Sheetz, Speedway, etc.. The price and convenience is the best part of them, but the quality of the product is not up to snuff in my opinion. The detergents used are a very generic blend of government required cleaners, but you never know what the carrier hauled in those tankers before coming there. If they didn't remember which compartment had diesel fuel inside, you can potentially ruin 8,000+ gallons of gasoline and a whole lot of cars.

In my short time with my AWD Trax, i found it runs best on the 89-91 octane range. I've burned full tanks from 87 octane to 93 octane, and there's a noticable difference between the way the engine handles them. 87 (24/34) gave pretty much normal performance and gas milage, 89-91 (26/35) makes it feel a little more responsive and actually boosted my milage nearly 2 mpg over the course of a tank, but 93 octane gave me intriguing results.

Basically the 93 (23/33) performed great, and the biggest difference in the responsiveness was the boost coming from the turbo. You can really feel the increase in power as pressure builds, but consequently I actually lost 1 mpg from the 87 octane numbers. I almost wonder if it burns off too clean at that octane rating and feels like it has to add a bit more fuel than normal to keep the ratios right.

Who knows, either way you'll find my tank filling up right in the middle of the selections. I've run practically all my cars on mid-grade for over 20 years now, seems like that's the right course to stay with this one also.
 

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the one i used when my Trax was being serviced said 87 octane and really unless your buying from a unknown retailer why would you spend the extra cash if you didn't have to unless of course you had bought a tune for it then well yes i would say yes to the middle grade or higher.
 

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If an extra 15-20 cents per gallon helps prolong the life of the turbo and engine as a whole, i think it's a small price to pay for me. Since my average fill-up is 10 gallons or less, i pretty much only spend an extra $1.50-$2.00 every two weeks. I lose more than that in change sitting on the couch or recliner. It's not much different than people who run regular 87 and put whatever brand of engine/fuel system cleaner that they prefer, a number of which recommend a bottle every other fill-up.

So for $36-$48 per year, i save myself a round trip to the parts store, buying something that costs just as much as my gas price difference or even double the $3-$4 monthly cost isn't as economical as many people think.in all my vehicles I've only had one fuel pump die, and that's a 20 year old Subaru with 189k on the odometer.
 

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I don't understand why people think that 87 octane is dirty gas, 93 is just 87 with added octane. My manual says 87 recommended so I stick to that. Plus I've proven to myself that mileage is better and performance is the same. Either way you are still going to have to dump some gas treatment now and again depending on your way and condition with which you drive. For instance if you always make short runs it's going to gum up or if you always baby it or do a lot of city driving.
 

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Untimely detonation causes deposits to collect faster in the cylinders, and since the octane ratings are representative of the detonation probability, I figure that it can't hurt to run at least the mid-grade fuel. I'll definitely agree that 93 is a waste unless the car required it, but I don't think eliminating some knock to a degree can't help but keep things in good working order for years to come.

Thankfully I don't have a ton of stop and go driving, I'm pretty much mixed city-highway every day so I'm generally in the 29-31 mph range. So hopefully as time goes along that little engine will keep chugging along.

Sent from my BND-L34 using Tapatalk
 

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The owner’s manual is a great place to start, as has been said.

I intend on keeping my Trax until the wheels fall off. Octane and fuel detergents absolutely matter over the life of the vehicle. Although designed to use regular unleaded gas, there is much better out there.

I use Shell V-Power only, from day one driving off the dealership lot. It will range between 91-93 octane. Several independent studies have shown increased efficiency and gas mileage, and less wear, for vehicles running premium 91+ octane fuel. A more efficient engine, burning less deposits and using less fuel, is better for the environment.

Shell V-Power has the highest concentration of polyetheramine (PEA), which is a fuel detergent. Techron Complete Fuel System Cleaner, by Chevron, has the highest concentration of PEA for any fuel additive; I drop one bottle in the tank every 60 days.

Hope that helps!
This is very good advice. I just purchased a 2019 Chevy Trax and have been experimenting with different octane levels. I do prefer Shell and will preferentially start filling up there. Years ago, a reliable mechanic told me the premium octane level burns cleaner and cooler, and therefore prolongs the life of the engine. Why would the car manufacturer give us the OK to use 87? Probably to shorten the life of the engine and force us to buy a new vehicle? It's a good theory!
So, this week, I am switching to Shell V and willing to pay the extra couple of dollars a week it costs me. I plan to keep my current Trax for as long as possible, so feeding it with more premium level products should be a big factor there.

Paris, new Chevy Trax Owner
 

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So, this week, I am switching to Shell V and willing to pay the extra couple of dollars a week it costs me. I plan to keep my current Trax for as long as possible, so feeding it with more premium level products should be a big factor there.

Paris, new Chevy Trax Owner
Maybe if yours is direct injection, but you'd be wasting money on a port injected engine that is designed to run on 87. My manual states 87 recommended. Timing and tune is programmed for 87. Once a year I throw in a bottle of GM fuel system treatment. I find this stuff works best. Now this is my opinion only...Do as you wish!!!!

 

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I'm trying an experiment this week: running my 2020 Trax LT on shell Premium 91 octane instead of the usual Regular 87 octane it gets filled up with. I have noticed that when the ambient temperature gets past about 28 C (82.4 F), my Trax's engine seems to produce noticeably less power when heavily loaded, say when going up a fairly steep hill. I have done a bit of thinking about this, and have wondered if the intercooler that lowers the temperature of the compressed (and therefore heated) engine intake air charge is running up against it's design limits during very hot weather, with that higher ambient air temperature making it more difficult to reject sufficient heat from the intake air charge flowing through it into the hotter than normal outside air. If this is indeed the case, and the temperature of the incoming fuel/air charge is too high, it may be more prone to predetonate. The resulting "spark knock" should be detected by the knock sensor and the ignition timing retarded to stop it from happening, resulting in reduced engine power output. I suspect that switching to 91 octane may lessen or eliminate this power loss during hot weather, albeit at a higher cost in fuel. Today I drove my Trax until there was about 80km driving range left (and a single bar showing on the fuel gauge), and then filled it with Shell Premium 91 octane. The real test should be later this week, with temperatures well above 30 C forecast. It will be interesting to see how it works out.

Here are some relevant and interesting links on the subject:
Science Direct - Combustion Knock
Combustion Knock - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

Note in particular:
"In order to benefit more from turbocharging without increasing compression temperature and causing combustion knock, the inlet air density must be raised further. Lowering engine compression ratio further, to permit higher turbocharger compression ratio, is unacceptable since engine efficiency suffers at all times. Two other options remain: charge air cooling and ignition timing retard, and both are used on virtually all turbocharged gasoline engines today."

"The influence of charge air cooling on knock-limited performance is shown in Figure 36; the lower temperature permits more advanced ignition timing before the onset of combustion knock, hence higher engine efficiency, boost pressure and performance (BMEP). In this figure, the BMEP gain due to charge cooling is approximately 15%, with an 8–10% advanced ignition timing. An air–air charge cooler is used to produce the minimum inlet manifold temperature and it is usually placed in front of or alongside the air–water radiator for the cooling system of the engine. For reasons of cost and compact installation, it is rarely possible to use a very large and effective air cooler, hence it is important to ensure a low pressure drop in the cooler and pipes so as not to offset the thermal effectiveness of the cooler on charge air density."

Also:
Road and Track - Premium Fuel Futures: A primer on high-test gasoline: Is it for you?
Premium Fuel Futures
 

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I will continue to use premium gasoline for my 2020 Trax LT. The hot weather arrived as forecast, with a vengeance. We had a couple of days where it reached 34C (93F), and about a week overall of weather where the maximum daily temperatures were not far below that. Despite the hot weather, I noticed that the slight power loss experienced before when driving up hills had disappeared. Even when it's not hot outside, I notice that I don't have to press the accelerator down quite as much to maintain a given speed, in effect like the engine is producing slightly more power. It's enough of a difference that I have had to "recalibrate" my right foot to avoid going too fast. I have also noticed a difference in fuel economy. By my calculations, based on km driven and fuel purchased at the same pump, and being careful to fill to the same level, I was getting a combined city/highway average of about 8.7 L/100km (27 MPG) when using regular gas from the local Shell station. With premium gas, I calculate that I am getting a combined average of 7.1 L/100km (33 MPG). I am frankly surprised at such a difference, and will continue to monitor my mileage to see if this is correct. This is with my Trax being driven with an eye towards maximizing fuel economy by the way: no hard acceleration, no prolonged idling, selecting routes and driving times where possible to minimize being stuck in traffic.
 

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Mine was the opposite worse MPG and pretty much same performance.
 

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I normally go to Holiday. 14 out of 15 I use 87. the last is 89. On rare occasion I use Kwik Trip 87. Both are Top Tier. My commute is 4 miles 1 way with occasional 20 mile (1 way) drives. 1 bottle complete fuel system cleaner twice a year. Bottom out a bit above 19, max out around 28. rarely a rough idle - and all of about 5 seconds when it does.
 

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Only time i run 93 octane is when i throw in fuel system cleaner, which is generally twice a year with the gas type change from sumer blend to winter blend and vice versa. Other than that I use 89 octane primarily.

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Just filled up my Trax with Shell V-Power 91 octane Premium again, which I have been running for a while now. I calculated the fuel mileage, and it worked out to 8.08 L/100km, or 29.11 MPG (US), with the dash display indicating 8.4 L/100km.This is combined around town and local highway (80 km/h speed limits). I still find that acceleration is noticeably smoother than it was when running 87 octane, especially during hard acceleration when heading up a highway on-ramp to merge with traffic. It is a bit more expensive, but I think I will be staying with it. For folks who are saying that they tried it and that performance was worse, yes, my Trax was like that for a few days of regular driving after filling up with V-Power from a nearly completely empty tank. After that it changed to what it is now; a noticeable increase in smoothness when accelerating along with a small but noticeable increase in engine performance. I suspect the slight difference in combustion behavior between 87 octane and 91 octane and the changes that result in the parameters monitored by the PCM take a while to be incorporated into it's fuel trim calculations, resulting in the slightly rougher running at first followed by slightly smoother running than was the case with 87 octane after several days. At the end of the day, I am happy with the difference and feel it is worth paying for, given the additive technology that is present in V-Power as well. I typically drive no more than 200 km a week, so it's not a large increase in cost for me. Canceling my Sirius subscription because the local terrain and foilage frequently blocks the signal (and the fact that I just don't listen to the radio much) has almost offset the cost difference for me.
 
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