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What type of traction device do i use on my tires, the manual says no chains. So I'm guessing the cable ones would be fine? I have the 18 inch rim/tire.
Thanks for your help
Robert
 

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If you live in an area where chains are required there are some new types of chains that are easier to install and take off.

Here are a few for you to consider.

Check out all the other ideas on you tube I'm sure you will find something that you can use for your driving conditions.
 

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Definitely be sure to check that out. Where I'm located, if you live in the North, it's okay but only certain types, but if you live in the South and you have them, it's a $1000 fine.
 

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Here in Pa you can't put studded tires on before Nov 1, and they must be off by April 15.

I haven't seen chains on cars here in over 50 years, I have seen them on some big trucks during snow storms, but not on cars at all.
 

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Here in Pa you can't put studded tires on before Nov 1, and they must be off by April 15.

I haven't seen chains on cars here in over 50 years, I have seen them on some big trucks during snow storms, but not on cars at all.
Have never gotten to drive anything with studded tires on them, how does it feel difference wise between tires that are and aren't studded ?
 

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Have never gotten to drive anything with studded tires on them, how does it feel difference wise between tires that are and aren't studded ?
You can hardly tell they are there, I don't use them myself but I know many people who like them.

The studs do come out over time, once you wear the tire down near the end of the tires life, they start popping out.

You can stud just about any snow tire, look for the little round holes near the outer threads, when buying snows ask if they can be studded, there used to be a 10 or 15 dollar up charge for studding each snow tire.

You can't stud an old snow tire, the holes need to be very clean and free of dirt to have the studs stay put, your throwing away money studding old snow tires the studs will fall out fast
 

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Best thing to do if you can is to buy tires that are studdable. I know for a fact that Hankook has some tires which allow that.

But one downside is you might discover a tire you like doesn't allow studs from the factory while a tire you don't like as much has the holes built right in.

Just make sure local laws allow you to use studs, some don't.
 

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Yea.. I definitely won't be able to use them but I did always wonder what they holes were for on my older winter tires. Thought it was something for traction, didn't know that's where you fit the studs. Thought those just kind... well stuck in randomly lol.

Thanks!
 

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Studs make no difference in snow. Studs are a huge improvement on ice.

As mentioned a bunch of times, check your local laws and the laws of anywhere you may travel. Some places studs and/or chains are illegal. Other places don't care, and some places they are required by law.
 

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I haven't tried them myself, but I've heard from several people that said the Bridgestone Blizzak tires are the best for snow and ice.
 

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The Blizzaks are amazing tires. But that being said, I wouldn't say best straight off the bat. There are a ton of other amazing tires out there and it really depends on what conditions your faced with. Conditions vary vastly depending on where you are and some tires out perform others in accordance.
 

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For snow and ice Blizzaks are great, but do not run them on dry pavement. They are made with a super soft compound to get a grip on snow and ice, they wear out REAL fast on pavement.
 

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I bought Cooper discoverers, I used to use them on my 4wd trucks I know they last a long time if you take care of them.

When I know I am going to need them I put them on as soon as I don't need them I take them off.

I have my Coopers for my Trax/Buick going on 2 years, I have about 100 miles on them, at this rate they will last longer than I will.

Anything with an aggressive thread is what you want to get moving in snow, they will be noisy on the highway, if getting to where your going is more important, get a wide open thread.
 

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Is your vehicle a FWD, RWD, or a 4*4?
Snow chains/ cables are, most of the times, not required with a four wheel drive, unless made mandatory by the state laws during a heavy snow storm or extremely harsh weather conditions. For a 2*2 vehicle, you again have a choice between cable chains, snow chains, and snow socks. I'd recommend you to go for snow chains, as they are super durable and provide excellent traction, even in extremely harsh conditions. Snow socks, being a little cheaper, are much more prone to wear and tear and do not last long. Most of the times, car manufacturers do no recommend the usage of such traction devices because they could damage the vehicle components, or sometimes scratch the rims, when abused. Just go for a good quality pair of chains and you'd be good to go. I'd recommend CB-12 snow chain by Thule. Stellar performance, easy to install, and amazing build quality.
 

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Snow tires are good enough here in Pa, I only put mine on when I can see a big storm coming, otherwise I keep my regular tires on the car.

Right after the roads are cleared I take off the snows, it only takes me about 20 min with calibrating TPMS and all.

I could do it faster if I used one of my impact wrenches but I prefer the socket and breaker bar way.
 
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